Martin Jakobsson and Markus Karasti deploy the 6 m long gravity corer from the aft deck of icebreaker Oden in Sherard Osborn Fjord.

Martin Jakobsson and Markus Karasti deploy the 6 m long gravity corer from the aft deck of icebreaker Oden in Sherard Osborn Fjord. Photo: Matt O’Regan.

Sediment cores reveal how Greenlandic glacier melts

The melting of the sea ice in the Arctic and the faster melting of Greenland’s ice cover are two prominent environmental changes that could accelerate sea level rise in the future. Researchers are therefore working on a broad front to better understand the mechanisms behind the melting ice and what consequences it will have. Matt O’Regan is a researcher at the Department of Geological Sciences at Stockholm University. His research … Läs mer…

Oden outside the Sherard Osborn Fjord, which connects the Ryder Glacier to the Lincoln Sea.

Oden outside the Sherard Osborn Fjord, which connects the Ryder Glacier to the Lincoln Sea. Photo: Martin Jakobsson.

“One of the most successful expeditions”

The Ryder 2019 Expedition with Swedish icebreaker Oden took place from early August to mid-September 2019 and included marine as well as land-based research. The overall scientific goal was to gain a better understanding of how climate affects the sensitive high Arctic environment.

The hut where Nordenskjöld wintered. Photo: Instituto Antarctico Argentino 2019

Antarctic expedition documents cultural heritage

Thawing permafrost may affect the historical remains of the first Swedish Antarctic Expedition, conducted in 1901–1903. Now, the Argentine-Swedish research expedition CHAQ 2020 will collect archaeological data that will, among other things, result in actions that can help preserve this cultural heritage. The first Swedish Antarctic Expedition was led by Otto Nordenskjöld using the vessel Antarctic. Upon reaching the Antarctic Peninsula, the expedition built a hut on the island of … Läs mer…

Johannes Måsviken collecting prey remains from an abandoned snowy owl (Bubo scandiacus) nest on central Warming Land in northern Greenland.

Johannes Måsviken collecting prey remains from an abandoned snowy owl (Bubo scandiacus) nest on central Warming Land in northern Greenland. Photo: Fredrik Dalerum.

Field work in the Arctic on the impact of climate on plants and animals

Fredrik Dalerum, Docent in Ecology at the Department of Zoology, Stockholm University, leads a research group that participated in this summer’s expedition with the icebreaker Oden to the Ryder Glacier in northwestern Greenland. In this research project, they study how Arctic species and ecosystems are affected by climate change.

Photo: Lars Lehnert.

Blog: “Back in Petermann Fjord”

September 2, 2019, the Ryder expedition. We have left the far north. We are now working a bit south of the north; we are back in Petermann Fjord. All the time in Ryder we always said – everything is better in Petermann. 2015 we did Petermann. Over 6 000 km of mapping. It felt like we cored sediment samples to the centre of the earth. Now we are back for more. … Läs mer…

Petermann glacier. Photo: Ida Kinner

Blog: “My theories are wrong”

August 30, 2019, The Ryder expedition. I have just scrapped my hypothesis. My theories are wrong. The paper I have been working on since 1991 will never be published. I am devastated. I don’t know where I stand. I have studied expedition psychology all these years. To what use now when all my findings are contradicted by this cruise? I mapped the psychology stages all these years. I thought I … Läs mer…

Icebreaker Oden during the Equestrian Expedition to Northwest Greenland 2019.

Blog: “Hard to claim we are the first”

August 28, 2019, the Ryder expedition. Lincon Sea, Canada or Greenland or in between. We saw a polynya and we managed to get there during the night. A new area, new mapping, new station program, new coring sites, piston coring, gravity coring, and multi coring. Then we have the water work: CTD, CTD, CTD, net, net, net. We claimed we are the first one here. Not true! More and more … Läs mer…

Helocoper is lowering down a buoy

Research buoy is lowered into the water during the expedition to Greenland 2019. Photo: Lars Lehnert

Blog: “The Holy Graal is yet to be discovered”

Still snowing. Winter is coming early. Around zero. Snowflakes get bigger every day. And the fog. Fog stopping us from helicopter operations. The land team was brought back last Friday and hoped for a shower, a good meal, some sleep and to get out again. Now they are stuck on board. Cloud base is too low. Their equipment is still out there at Camp site 1. Weather came in and … Läs mer…